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Students experimenting in physics laboratory
© picture-alliance / ZB
German Team wins Physics World Cup

June 04, 2008

On Tuesday, May 27 the German team of young researchers won the Physics World Cup at the 21st International Young Physicists Tournament held in Croatia. The award-winning team is part of a long line of successful young physicists from Germany.

The group of recent high school graduates was one of 24 participating teams from Europe and abroad. The finale saw the German team – five young scientists from Baden-Württemberg – compete against the Croatian and New Zealand teams-the runner ups. The German group’s success built on the national team’s five wins since 1995.

The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a competition among teams of secondary school students in their ability to solve complicated scientific problems, to present solutions to these problems and to defend them in scientific discussions called "Physics Fights.

The International Organizing Committee of the Young Physicist Tournament (IYPT) decides about 17 problems. These problems come from different disciplines of physics and are sometimes also interdisciplinary. The problems of the IYPT are not tasks which can be solved within a short time with known methods, like in an exam. They are deliberately formulated in a more open way. They can be viewed from different angles and there are many ways to handle them. The task of the participants (together with their team leader) during the preparation phase is to get as much knowledge about the problems as possible.

Prior to the annual tournament, the teams were given 17 challenging physics questions ranging from the viscosity of shampoo to the flight characteristics of the propeller-like acorn seed which they had six months to answer. The results were presented during the competition.

The months-long preparation time is used by the participating teams for experimentation and to create computer simulations. The research projects are then presented at the tournament in front of the expert jury.

The German teams also won the Physics World Cup in 1995, 1999, 2003 and 2005.



© Young Germany / German Information Centre New Delhi
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